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COVID-19 will redefine the way we produce and consume content forever.
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We are devoting our Knowledge section to everything you need to know about the ways our industry is changing. If you have any questions at all, or want us to feature something here, please drop us a line and we'll be happy to help you.

Tarryn Paul

Tarryn Paul
Tarryn's been producing award-winning content for over a decade with global brands including Levi's, MAC Cosmetics, Vodafone and Nikon. She's worked on a myriad of genres in the online world, including social experiments, promos, short documentary, comedy and drama. She loves keeping clients happy and ensures that every project is delivered on time and on budget, and is an enjoyable and exciting process for the entire team.
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Recent Posts

5 Ways To Make Content Go Viral (or at least improve the chances!)

Posted by Tarryn Paul
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In researching this blog post, it became apparent that there are A LOT of opinions out there about the best way to make content go viral.

Some are adamant that all you need to do is follow these ‘simple steps’ and you’re guaranteed a viral hit.
Others are a little more pragmatic and recognise that there is often no telling what is going to capture the world’s attention.

But one thing they all agree on is that there are certain things you can do to greatly improve your chances. So here are five of the best…

1. Refine and commit to your brand personality

Image of nike logo over sweaterTo be truly successful, viral content should be unique to its maker. Your voice, your values, your perspective is what will make that viral content uniquely and memorably yours over any other brand’s.

So, before you do anything else, really refine and commit to your brand personality.

A brand personality should be reflective of its target audience, so think about their priorities, behaviours, wants and needs - what do they respond to?
Now use that as the basis for your output.

Because, at the end of the day, you don’t just want to reach as many people as possible for the sake of it – if you did, you could just film a funny video of your cat and be done with it.
You want to reach the people that are actually going to follow through and engage with your brand.

So don’t lose track of who you are and who your audience is in the pursuit of virality.

2. Focus on the platforms that best suit your audience

phone with social media iconsYour target audience should be your greatest inspiration here – seek out the platforms that they frequent. Don’t make them work to find your content – demonstrate that you value them enough to take it to them.

And, once you’ve pinpointed those platforms, create a consistent campaign across all of them. Optimise the content for each platform individually, whether that means creating versions in different aspect ratios, with or without sound, or with different run lengths.

Making the viewing experience as easy and enjoyable as possible will greatly improve the chances of engagement.


3. Have a strategy

post it notes on the wall
We live in a world that is saturated with content - which makes standing out all the harder.
Your audience’s attention is a precious commodity, so they need to trust that when you release content, it’s going to be worth their time.

One way to ensure that your content has cut-through is to really think about why you’re making it.
Having a strategy means that you avoid making content for the sake of it, and only release content that is meaningful for your audience and purposeful for your brand.

Which is not to say that all content should be planned months, even years, in advance. A spontaneous, responsive piece of content that rides momentum can be hugely effective.

But for the content that is planned, make sure that you’re spending your budget in the most effective way by using it strategically.


4. Think about why audiences share and play to it

eggs with faces drawn on them
There’s a difference between watching and sharing. And viral content gets traction because it’s shared.
So why do we share something?

In short, to make ourselves look good. Whether it’s reflecting our intelligence, our empathy, our sense of humour, our interests… taking a piece of content and sharing it is a public declaration of our thoughts, feelings and values.

Therefore, when making content, it’s important to think about what aspect of it people might want to use as social currency with the valuable people in their network.

When striving for a viral hit, be honest with yourself and ask, ‘would I share this with my network if I had no connection to this brand?’

5. Encourage Interaction

two people on a bench textingIn addition to sharing content, think about other ways that people might engage with it.

Encouraging audience interaction - in the form of comments, likes, UGC, and related tags - can elevate content from being a proclamation to a conversation.

This helps the campaign to feel inclusive, which brings us back to the idea of emotional connections. Everyone wants to feel part of a tribe and if all our peers participate in something, chances are we’ll want to interact with it as well.

So invite comments, encourage interpretations, ask questions, set challenges. Make your content about more than just your brand – make it about your audience as well.

2020 and 2021 have demonstrated how creative we can get given such stringent filming limitations. Casual Films has pivoted to continue to meet our clients' needs even in our new normal. Need to communicate ever-changing strategy? We've got you covered with delightful animations and snappy edits. Absolutely need to show your employees or facilities? Our team is well-versed in all the COVID-safe precautions to make filming in-person both safe and effective. Sound useful? Get in touch with one of our experienced Executive Producers for a test drive...

Topics: Production process, Purpose driven video, Brands as broadcasters, Coronavirus Content, Video production from home

Going Remote with Bloomberg in a COVID-19 World

Posted by Tarryn Paul
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Being able to travel to new parts of the world for work is a huge perk for a lot of us here at Casual. However, the Covid-19 pandemic put a halt on international travel for the most part, in order to keep our crew and staff safe in a world where travel restrictions and Covid-19 numbers seem to change on a daily, if not hourly, basis.

Yet, content still needs to be filmed, and this new world required us to think creatively and problem-solve to ensure a positive outcome for our clients. When Bloomberg came to us needing to shoot in Angola by the end of 2020, we had to think outside of the box.  

Crane lifting palates

Bloomberg have a very strong signature style when it comes to shooting their content. We work with a reliable team who understand this, and often travel far and wide to achieve the right result. So, it's always a little unnerving when that team are unable to be on the ground to ensure that interviews and B-roll are hitting the mark.

Coffee/tea grounds

Problem-solving is what we do best, however, so we wasted no time in scouring our contacts to find a strong recommendation for a local production company in Angola. They had some excellent work on their reel, and we spent a lot of time in conversation with them to ensure they understood the brief and what we needed from the shoot. We also got our regular director in on the project to work remotely with the local crew and put together a clear style guide for the local crew. 

Man looking at camera with crossed armsThe Angola team were able to offer us eyes on every interview by connecting the camera feed to Zoom, so we could listen in on interviews and give our feedback in real-time.  

An additional challenge was some interviewees only being able to speak Portuguese, but the local team rose to the challenge here as well, offering us live translating as the interviews happened. This enabled us to ensure we captured the right content. 

shot of two people in a manufacturing facilityThe most important part of this project was constant communication. As producer, I communicated daily with the local producer to ensure interviews were booked in, locations confirmed, and the schedule was progressing as it should. 

There were setbacks - mainly with contributors dropping out last minute, or going completely AWOL, forcing us to find replacements at the final hour, but having a local team on the ground as opposed to a team only in the country for a short amount of time meant that we could be flexible and rearrange interviews when needed.

woman being interviewed with a field in the backgroundWhile we can't wait to be able to travel freely again, it's been a brilliant learning curve to manage complex remote shoots, and be able to support our clients in these sometimes challenging times.

2020 has demonstrated how creative we can get given such stringent filming limitations. Casual Films has pivoted to continue to meet our clients' needs even in our new normal. Need to communicate ever-changing strategy? We've got you covered with delightful animations and snappy edits. Absolutely need to show your employees or facilities? Our team is well-versed in all the COVID-safe precautions to make filming in-person both safe and effective. Sound useful? Get in touch with one of our experienced Executive Producers for a test drive...

Topics: Production process, Talking head, Project management, Case Study, Coronavirus Content, Video production from home

Using video to fight knife crime and wasted lives

Posted by Tarryn Paul
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Topics: Purpose driven video, Case Study

Filming in the Time of COVID-19

Posted by Tarryn Paul
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There’s a lot to worry about these days. Revenue is down. Staff are scattered. Budgets frozen. Yet your customers and employees need to stay informed and reassured. Casual Films has shifted to provide COVID-safe productions both remotely and on site. UK Producer Tarryn Paul shares some of her thoughts on shooting in the 'new normal' below.

I never would have envisioned a time where I would turn down the chance to go out for dinner on multiple occasions, where my mental checklist before leaving the house was the mantra 'phone, keys, wallet, mask, hand sanitizer' and where I would go for months without hugging my friends or family. 
 
But of course, none of us imagined it, and yet here we are. Six months into a global pandemic, where it is completely normal to cross the street to avoid someone, (anyone), where our social behaviors have been turned upside down.
 
As we settle into this new normal in our daily social lives, so must we settle into it as we get back into production. And when a huge amount of your work relies on you being physically with people, often in close proximity, this can be easier said than done, especially with constantly changing guidelines. 
 
As the COVID-19 dust has settled over the last few months, a shoot I had scheduled in March was pushed back to August, and I've spent the last few weeks problem-solving how we still deliver an excellent series of films for our client whilst ensuring their safety, as well as the safety of our crew and acting talent.
 
I am sure we're all aware of the many precautionary actions we all need to take to prevent the transmission of the virus, so I won't bore you, but what I will say is that common sense is always the starting point (as it should be) when risk assessing any production.
 
Temperature checks before we start, masks for the crew, social distancing, good airflow, sanitizing all surfaces and props, and regular breaks to wash hands are all things we're ensuring are key in all of our productions. We're also abolishing the use of shared paper - so no more call sheets and paper scripts littering the set. Plus, a huge amount of form filling - Specialized Covid Risk Assessments, Health Declaration Forms and Method Statements, to name a few. 
 
Long lenses, boom mics and reducing crew numbers are also things that we're actively doing for each shoot we plan. I've also arranged to have a green room each day, so that our client can view the action on a monitor without having to be in the same room as the crew.
 
 
Finally, pivoting the creative, where possible, to reduce the contact between actors is something I've been able to do for this particular shoot, so that each actor has their own day for filming. We managed to change one scene from being a face to face scene to a telephone call instead, and are using the subtle dynamic of this type of interaction to further the drama (for example, you can't roll your eyes at someone in person without seeming rude, but you can on a phone call) 
 
This of course isn't always possible, especially for ideas developed in a pre-pandemic era, but as we're developing creatives for new projects, we're always looking at ways to bring the idea to life, whilst still ensuring the safety of everyone on set.
 
Whilst donning masks, and checking people's temperatures will be a very different experience to my last shoot, I am extremely excited to get back on set, and start making content again - here's to the new normal - for now. 

 

 

 

We're here to provide an outlet. A supplier that will hit the ground running with the most proactive and reliable production service around.

We’ll make commissioning a video the easiest part of your day by taking on as much of the lift as we can. 

Our teams are veterans of thousands of briefs from the largest names in business. Our processes have been honed over 13 years of fast paced, high volume video production.

 We will deliver for you. So that’s one less thing to worry about. Contact us today. 

 

Topics: Coronavirus Content

I'm Out: Fighting knife crime with Haringey Council

Posted by Tarryn Paul
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Topics: Case Study

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